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Reviews

Art and Brexit: SLEEK #59

I heard that the autumn 2018 issue of SLEEK was doing Brexit. I’m a big fan of this Berlin-based arts magazine and, like any sane person, I'm anxious about where we’re headed with Brexit, so I wondered how this would mesh.

By

Daniel McCabe

Reviews

Elementum

Sometimes the world can seem a dark and foreign place, where the news spews doom and gloom at every turn and nothing can be done. It’s very easy to get stuck within the humdrum of life, believing that it has never been any different. Elementum inspires you to look upwards at the clouds and the birds, to truly see the trees and wildlife around you, and the people who dedicate their lives to it. Just as we continually seem to separate mind and body, we separate ourselves from the world we inhabit. Elementum is not only a journal of nature and story, but a crossing, so that we might re-enter a forgotten place.

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

Journal du Thé

On the cover of Journal du Thé, Mio Kamiya pours boiling water into a small ceramic teapot. Swirls of steam drift up to her downcast eyes. It seems to be me there is a ceremony or an event going on, but maybe that’s just because I only ever make a pot of tea if I’m having guests. Tea doesn’t always demand formality, but sometimes it’s nice to pander to its heritage and the sense of occasion it brings.

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

nomad

nomad is a culture magazine for the design conscious. Minimal in design, it is nonetheless adventurous in its layout and content, with thought-provoking articles that come somewhat unexpectedly. You don’t have to be a designer to enjoy this magazine, you only need to have an open mind and a sense of intrigue when it comes to what is happening in the world.

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

Ladybeard

Don’t try searching for ‘beauty’ on the web because if you did you would get, like I did, millions upon millions of references and images of the unattainable or, seductively, the nearly attainable, if you are prepared to sacrifice your wallet, your health and months under the knife.

By

Susie Polakova

Reviews

Goldie

The nascent Goldie promises much and delivers interesting and, dare I say, unique articles in a first issue acute observations and noble aspirations: ‘For so long we have been labelled according to our age as if creativity, relevance and vibrancy automatically taper off as another page turns on the calendar.’ Well, hurrah. At long last.

By

Susie Polakova

Reviews

Suspira

Fear resides in half-seen things, shadows without bodies, flickers in your periphery. It's in the primal place that sends our heartbeat racing and leaves us in a cold sweat. And now, fear lurks in Suspira, too. Spawned by the Dreadful Press laboratory, the home of Sabat, it stares into the void where grotesque, supernatural and unnerving monsters in all their forms live and puts them onto paper with an intellectual eye for our own enjoyment (can it be that?). Could you find a better hand to hold to navigate this darkness?

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

Caboodle

I have consumed many magazines hoping to find one that's different, one that isn't filled with a vlogger's top tips or some other similar mush, and with Caboodle I have definitely found it. I think everything about Caboodle can be summed up by the back pages of the magazine, the first Girls Just Want to Have Fun (of course) and this edition Make Your Own Sunshine (which I cannot agree with more).

By

Frankie Polakova

Reviews

The Plant

Let us begin with a cliché (since you won't find any in this gardening magazine). The Plant really grows on you. Back with a new design, wider and higher page dimensions with a more bookish feel, this Spanish/UK hybrid is living in the world of botanicals, but there any resemblance to common gardening magazines will end.

By

Susie Polakova

Reviews

She Shreds

Sometimes magazines are made because someone wants to speak but doesn’t know what to say – or worse – has nothing to say. She Shreds has a voice and a clear-cut message: despite doubt, women guitarists and bassists exist. It seems an absurd statement to make, but the prevalence of the constant disregard and exclusion of women musicians has ignited this magazine into existence. And the fire is fierce.

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

Autodidact

We’ve always stocked a lot of art magazines. Possibly far too many, and in the middle of last year, after we worked out how many we sold in relation to the focus we put on them and the space they took up in Magalleria, we decided to move them somewhere else. We put interior design magazines in their place. Suddenly people started asking for them again and buying them in improved numbers. By the end of the year we’d pretty much moved them back where they were.

By

Daniel McCabe

Reviews

Mushpit

The lovechild of journalist Bertie Brandes and stylist Charlotte Roberts, Mushpit is full of nervous, restless energy and good humour. To the untrained eye, it appears a cacophony of bad Photoshop, peculiar typography and garish design, but look a little deeper and you’ll find that this is not trash, but very clever treasure.

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

Gather Journal

We’ve noted before that Lucky Peach, one of the standout independent food magazines, is mopping its mouth and bowing out before the next course. So who's head of the table? Already there is Gather Journal, which in fact launched 2012, and it’s magisterial. Eat with your eyes.

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

Run For Your Life

I’ve written or edited scores of patient information resources. My big takeaway from health comms was working out that we prefer or trust the information we get from fellow sufferers, people who’ve also experienced what we have, or are likely to. Clinicians can give us the facts, but we may not want to hear them. Often we just don’t understand the language they use. And, more than likely, it lacks empathy. Run for Your Life is a new magazine that shares the viewpoint of the everyday runner and, although I am not one of those and I'm still unlikely to enter next year's Bath Half-Marathon, I knew straight away I was going to enjoy it.

By

Daniel McCabe

Reviews

The Skirt Chronicles

In the first article of the first issue of The Skirt Chronicles, Haydée Toutiou, one of the magazine's co-founders, sits in the Neue Galerie in New York with a slice of Sachertorte and a coffee. She realises the warmth in her chest is akin to yearning and familiarity, brought about by overhearing a deep conversation in German and spending the preceding hour sighing over early twentieth century tableware. Surrounded by history and culture, she dwells on the intriguing sensation of being rooted in the present yet longing for the past as if it was an old friend or an estranged family member, fondly remembered. It is this sensation that grounds The Skirt Chronicles and gives it integrity. Its reverence for the past and sweet-scented nostalgia is what makes it so enjoyable.

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

Marimo

Whether it’s Kubo in his firelit cave, Belle bursting from the cosy cottage or Woody meeting Buzz, most journeys in animation begin at home. The hero is yet to set out on an adventure, whether they want one or not. It is also where Marimo begins its story, silhouetted by a roaring pink fire bursting from a television screen. Quite an entrance.

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

Future Fossil Flora

On a smooth matt blue cover, a blistering orange bloom curls into view. This is the inaugural issue of Future Fossil Flora, a modern botanical study focusing on a single flower in each edition. The culture of flowers is unrelentingly romantic and the intoxicating poppy, whose head droops as if weighed down by its own connotations, precedes its reputation.

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

The New Story

From the creators Australian kids’ fashion magazine Papier Mache, The New Story dwells in a pastel paradise of parenthood, but it’s not all pretty pictures – this kid has talent.

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

Messy Heads

When a magazine selects a theme it can be quite loose and tenuous, a thin net containing a random collection of work. Messy Heads has dealt with the self in its first issue and rebellion in the second, but its third issue really, well, hits home.

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

Record Culture Magazine

A decade ago my record collection took over our home. I now have a handle on it and try to avoid record shops. If I enter a charity or junk shop the urge to rummage for vinyl is under control. Attending a record fair is out of the question because they're particularly ruinous. I confess that I used to buy records not just for the music, but often for the covers. I must have been the youngest person on the planet to own a copy of Relax with Raymond Wallbank at the Organ.

By

Daniel McCabe

Reviews

The Protagonist

Cast your eye over the fashion section and you may feel it to be overbearing and exclusionary. Have hope. The Protagonist Magazine simultaneously slips under the radar as an unassuming and yet astounding product of fashion and culture. In its third issue it explores the aesthetic of reflections, lending itself an (if possible) romantic Jekyll and Hyde duality.

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

Recorder

Recorder is a new, visual and literary celebration of pop deities as experienced in time and place. We’re not talking discographies here, or analytical discourse or career mapping. It’s a light examination of our (faraway) relationship with our icons and how, over decades and around the world, they have influenced and informed our lives. It’s an innovative idea and the launch issue of this intended biannual kicks off with David Bowie.

By

Daniel McCabe

Reviews

Goodbye Lucky Peach, Hello Sabor

I only work occasionally in Magalleria, and even less now the wonderful Libby has joined us. This means I’m not so well versed on all the magazines when I am here, but I continue to bluff my ignorance by declaring that I’m the food, drink and travel person. So it falls to me to mention a couple of recent food magazines.

By

Susan Greenwood

Reviews

5054

I no longer own a car because we live in central Bath where it's possible to walk to most places. I miss driving, but I don’t really know anything about cars and I don’t miss the cost of running one or the hassle of using it in a car-unfriendly city and my fear of breakdowns. So I’m not the sort of person drawn to 5054, a magazine about ‘automotive culture’. But I was wrong.

By

Daniel McCabe

Reviews

Anxy

Anxy aims to de-stigmatise mental health and encourage mental wellbeing by providing an area in which to discuss emotions. It does not aim to solve them, more create a safe space in which to consider them. Above all, it succeeds in taking the fear out of opening-up. When you can’t find the words, Anxy will speak for you. In its first issue it eases the lid off our most flammable emotion: anger.

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

Riposte

In times of plenty it is very easy to be noncommittal. Articles crammed on webpages, social media rants to trawl through and endless, endless hyperlinks. More and more all I want is information, without bias, being berated or ending up disheartened. Riposte suits just fine.

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

Tom Tom

There is a restless creative and musical energy that boils in Brooklyn; it’s called TomTom, and they care about drummers, music and feminism. As they say, more than a magazine, it's a movement.

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

YES & NO

YES & NO is a much-anticipated, Pentagram-designed quarterly making a bid for the front rank of intelligent and opinionated cultural magazines. It looks promising on the outside – is it as good as we hope? Yes or No?

By

Daniel McCabe

Reviews

Cartography

There’s something about a large format magazine that gives it undeniable weight and presence. Often used for fashion, travel is just as suitable and underused. If most of the content is photography, why not give it the space to shine? Cartography utilises this to its advantage, and has produced something that is simultaneously striking and intimate.

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

Athleta

‘Athleta: one who is giving his all in an effort to overcome a sporting challenge, but, even more so, in an effort to surpass himself.’ Sport can come across as a hobby, a necessary evil to keep fit and healthy or, as a profession, a pursuit for fame. Athleta, with its minimalist cover of a locker room inhabited by two standing prosthetic legs, conveys it has something different to say. More pointedly, it has a better story to tell.

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

Sunday Girl

“To all the girls, never doubt that you are valuable and powerful and deserving of every chance and opportunity in the world to pursue and achieve your own dreams.”

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

The Baffler

We opened Magalleria to offer something different. Different magazines of course, but effectively different information, different tastes, different opinions and so on. The Baffler is a left-leaning US journal of cultural and political analysis that ought to be better known here. As we seemingly lurch into an age of fear – or right wing populism as the magazine itself would put it – The Baffler is providing some interesting angles.

By

Daniel McCabe

Reviews

Space Magazine

We sell a lot of Apartamento at Magalleria. It seems we can never order enough so we’re always scouting for similar interior design magazines. We think we’ve found one, but we didn’t think it would come out of Denmark. Meet Space Magazine…

By

Daniel McCabe

Reviews

Beauty Papers

Beauty Papers peels back the mask of branded, formulaic fashion to reveal creases of skin underneath, something unabashedly human and, well, beautiful.

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

SOME SUCH

It’s unaccountably satisfying to track down magazines from all over the world to bring them to Magalleria and to be able to tell everyone what you’ve found. Yet oddly more exciting is to have a new magazine spring up in your own backyard that seems, well, so exotic. When SOME SUCH magazine appeared this month we just about had to go and lie down in a dark room.

By

Daniel McCabe

Reviews

Lunch Lady

If you're like me and you can flick through Instagram for foodie-themed delights or while away the hours pinching ideas from cookbooks, but find your stomach still empty of an original idea, Lunch Lady has a flavour to savour.

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

The Moth

The Spring instalment of The Moth is here. Not to be confused with the US storytelling platform, this is a mere slip of a magazine costing only £4 but one that’s become invaluable to us because it offers both genuine literary nourishment and the inspiration to publish something yourself.

By

Daniel McCabe

Reviews

Luncheon

I wasn’t ready for our third Luncheon. I’d barely digested the last, generous issue when the latest beauty turned up on Shrove Tuesday. Luncheon, if you haven’t got around to it, is a cultured conversation about art, photography, literature and other many nice things arranged around culinary props and served in the manner of courses in a formal luncheon.

By

Daniel McCabe