Welcome to Magazine Heaven.

Magalleria stocks a vast range of high quality magazines sourced from the UK, US, Europe and around the world. Many of the magazines we sell are exclusive to us. We're based in Bath but you can browse and buy safely and securely right here with a credit card or via PayPal. If you can’t see what you’re looking for, please email us and we’ll see what we can do.

We'll carefully package your order and post it to you within 48 hours. If you’re ordering from outside the UK we ask that you email your request to us first.

Please have a good look around. You'll find our blog below. You can read articles, interviews and reviews here, or go on to the Magalleria shop. You can find out a bit more about us on the Bath Store page. In any case, thanks for dropping by.

Publishers: please send your submission requests to magalleria@icloud.com. With the current volume of enquiries we can't guarantee a response to messaging via social media.

blog

We were quite taken by the launch issue of this smart magazine last year, particularly because it appeared to come out of very diverse, creative feminist base. If we hoped too that a title in the top rank of intelligent women's magazines might push out much further to deliver something a little more free, even expressionist, and certainly more 'out there'. And, lo, The September Issues did.  The second issue is even more impressive. Packed with arresting images and profiles that are bold and definitive where, elsewhere, they often seem like mere posturing, and teamed with an impressive cast or contributors, this is very inspirational. BUY NOW
We don’t believe there’s enough useful online information and discussion about magazines. The Magalleria blog provides opinion, reviews, interviews and a bit of news about what’s going on in print. We also genuinely want to know more about the people who love and buy magazines – of all ages – rather than just the views of magazine makers. 

Interviews

hotdog

hotdog, the off-kilter feminist poetry and illustration magazine has just dropped their third release, the ‘Delightfully Unprofessional’ issue that’s really made people sit up. We caught up with the magazine’s founders, Megan Conery and Molly Taylor, and asked what they’re up to.

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

Goldie

The nascent Goldie promises much and delivers interesting and, dare I say, unique articles in a first issue acute observations and noble aspirations: ‘For so long we have been labelled according to our age as if creativity, relevance and vibrancy automatically taper off as another page turns on the calendar.’ Well, hurrah. At long last.

By

Susie Polakova

Reviews

Suspira

Fear resides in half-seen things, shadows without bodies, flickers in your periphery. It's in the primal place that sends our heartbeat racing and leaves us in a cold sweat. And now, fear lurks in Suspira, too. Spawned by the Dreadful Press laboratory, the home of Sabat, it stares into the void where grotesque, supernatural and unnerving monsters in all their forms live and puts them onto paper with an intellectual eye for our own enjoyment (can it be that?). Could you find a better hand to hold to navigate this darkness?

By

Libby Borton

Reviews

Caboodle

I have consumed many magazines hoping to find one that's different, one that isn't filled with a vlogger's top tips or some other similar mush, and with Caboodle I have definitely found it. I think everything about Caboodle can be summed up by the back pages of the magazine, the first Girls Just Want to Have Fun (of course) and this edition Make Your Own Sunshine (which I cannot agree with more).

By

Frankie Polakova

Reviews

The Plant

Let us begin with a cliché (since you won't find any in this gardening magazine). The Plant really grows on you. Back with a new design, wider and higher page dimensions with a more bookish feel, this Spanish/UK hybrid is living in the world of botanicals, but there any resemblance to common gardening magazines will end.

By

Susie Polakova

Reviews

She Shreds

Sometimes magazines are made because someone wants to speak but doesn’t know what to say – or worse – has nothing to say. She Shreds has a voice and a clear-cut message: despite doubt, women guitarists and bassists exist. It seems an absurd statement to make, but the prevalence of the constant disregard and exclusion of women musicians has ignited this magazine into existence. And the fire is fierce.

By

Libby Borton

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